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Verbs as Complements

How to use Verbs as Complements

1) This construction is used with the verbs listed below:

VERB+ GERUND (VERB-ING)

 

admit delay miss regret risk
appreciate deny postpone report suggest
avoid enjoy practice resent  
can’t help finish quit resist
consider mind recall resume

 

The sentence construction would be as follows:

SUBJECT+ VERB+ GERUND+ COMPLEMENT+ MODIFIER

Examples:

I enjoy studying English at the CBA.

He considered traveling to Europe for the summer, but he doesn’t have enough funds.

 

2) This construction is used with the verbs listed below:

VERB+ INFINITIVE (TO VERB)

 

agree expect intend prepare try
attempt fail learn pretend want
claim forget mean propose wish
decide have need refuse  
demand hesitate offer seem
desire hope plan tend

 

Examples:

I decided to refuse the invitation.

He pretended to be someone else.

She forgot to bring her keys.

 

 3) With the following Verbs the Sentence doesn’t change meaning if you use the gerund (ing) or the infinitive

begin continue
like prefer
can’t stand start
love hate

 

VERB+ GERUND (VERB-ING)

  or

VERB+ INFINITIVE (TO VERB)

 

 4) With the following Verbs the Sentence has Different Meaning

 Stop

Remember

Forget

 

VERB+ GERUND (VERB-ING) – Means forever

Example:

She stopped studying Engineering when she got pregnant.  

Meaning she won’t study Engineering any more.  She stopped studying forever.

or

VERB+ INFINITIVE (TO VERB)

 Example:

She stopped to study English when I called her. 

Meaning that she will continue to study after her break.

 

5) Use of prepositions with the -Ing Form

VERB+ PREPOSITION+ VERB-ING

List of Prepositions that use this construction:

as a result of from in view of thanks to
at in of through
because of in exchange for on account of with
by means of in return for on the strength of without
by virtue of in spite of out of  
for fear of in the face of owing to
for lack of in the light of  
for want of

 EXCEPTION:  But, except.

Example:

He hid the wallet, for fear of being stolen.

She was really famous, as a result of acting as Mary in the Jesus Christ film.

Courage in the Face of Eviction Nightmare

 

6) Use of Adjectives with the infinitive form

ADJECTIVES + INFINITIVE

 

Construction:

VERB+ ADJECTIVE+ TO VERB

 

List of adjectives that use this construction: 

able dangerous good ready
anxious difficult hard strange
boring eager pleased usual
common easy prepared  

 Examples:

I’m pleased to meet you

It’s difficult to understand some people.

I’m prepared to take this test.

Rafael is eager to meet you.

 

7) Use a Pronoun before the Infinitive form 

Certain verbs require the following construction:

SUBJECT+ VERB+ PRONOUN+ TO VERB

 

Allow    Ask

Beg

Convince  Expect

Instruct

Invite   Order

Permit

PersuadePrepare

Promise

RemindUrge

Want

 

The pronouns to be used are object pronouns: ME, YOU, HIM, HER, IT, US, YOU, THEM.

 Example:

He orders her to study for the test.

My mother promised me to take me to the mall.

Rahima convinced him to purchase an expensive purse.

 

8) Use the -ing (gerung) form of a verb after the possessive form.

 

SUBJECT+ VERB+ POSSESSIVE FORM+ VERB-ING

 

Possessive form: MINE, YOURS, HIS, HERS, ITS, YOURS, OURS, THEM, MY, YOU , HIS HER, ITS, YOURS,  THEIR.

Example:

I understand her feeling.

 

9) Use of the verb need with different nouns (living and things) 

With living things use need and the infinitive form of the verb.

LIVING THING+ NEED+ INFINITIVE

George needs to work out more often.

THING+ NEED+ GERUND (ING)TO BE+ PAST PARTICIPLE

The blender needs to be repaired.

The blanket needs to be cleaned.

 

10) Use of subjunctives

 

SUBJECT+ VERB+ THAT+ SUBJECT+ VERB WORD + ….+

 

Joe prefers that she speak with him personally.

 

VERBS WITH THAT:

AdviceAsk

Command

Decree

DemandDesire

Insist

 

MoveOrder

Prefer

 

RecommendRequest

Require

 

StipulateSuggest

Urge

 

 

NOUNS WITH THAT:

Recommendation

Requirement

Suggestion

 

ADJECTIVES WITH THAT

 

IT+ BE+ ADJECTIVE+ THAT+ SUBJECT+ VERB WORD

 

 

AdvisedImperative

Important

MandatoryNecessary

Obligatory

ProposedRecommended

Require

SuggestedUrgent

 

 


March 20, 2015
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